Archive for the ‘new work’ Category



Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Tampa Bay Times

An illustration of mine ran in the Tampa Bay Times this last weekend, on Sunday July 8. I don’t do a lot of editorial work these days, so it’s cool to have a big one like this that works well in a newspaper format. The idea is that the future is full of unknowns right now — education, health care, economy, home prices, and so on. The idea dovetailed nicely with the busy chaos in Everything Goes. Below the finished piece are a few of sketches showing the work in progress. The one on the left is the initial rough just to get the structure of the illustration down. The color one in the center is the first sketch I sent to the client. They asked for a few changes and the next iteration on the right is shat I use to make the final art. Click on the sketch image to enlarge it.

sketches for the Tampa Bay Times piece

Wednesday, May 23rd, 2012

2wheelers is a magazine/journal from Sweden, and they asked me to design the cover of their second issue. You might notice a familiar theme in this design. In the video, pay special attention at about :42.

Also, you need the poster. Big screenprinted thing. They really did an amazing job. Click on the image to go to their online shop.

2wheelers poster

Monday, May 7th, 2012

Mudpuppy Dinosaur Block puzzle

A new dinosaur puzzle. I must like dinosaurs because I draw a lot of them.

Mudpuppy Dinosaur Block puzzle

This is a cool little thing from Galison/Mudpuppy, for whom I’ve made a lot of toys and puzzles. Six dinosaurs and one puzzle. The puzzle comes as a series of nine cubes, with each side being a piece of one of the puzzles.

Mudpuppy Dinosaur Block puzzle

Mudpuppy Dinosaur Block puzzle

Mudpuppy Dinosaur Block puzzle

Mudpuppy Dinosaur Block puzzle

You can get this here at the Mudpuppy site.

I have an extra one of these and I’d like to give it away to someone, so I thought I’d have a little contest. There are six dinosaurs here, right? Send me an email with all six dinosaurs correctly listed (and list the colors so I can tell which one you’re naming). Of all of the right answers I’ll pick one winner from random, okay?

[nggallery id=29]

So you have this week. I’ll pick the winner on Friday afternoon, around 3pm Eastern Time. Send your email to brian at mrbiggs dot com. You could leave it as a comment if you want, but then you’d be giving your answers away to everyone who reads this post. So instead of doing that, use email, and then just write a funny joke about dinosaurs in the comments. Cool?

Oh yeah, the winner has to send a picture of themselves building the puzzle when they get it. Okay? Good luck.

Monday, April 16th, 2012


When Everything Goes was first conceived and planned, it was decided that in addition to the three picture books (On Land, In The Air, and By Sea) there would also be about a million board books – those cute little thick books made for teensy young people — and several thousand “I Can Read” books, which are smallish books written at different reading levels for not-quite-as-teensy-but-still-young kids.
So the first I Can Read books, Henry in a Jam, came out a few weeks ago. These ICR books take Henry out of the little story arcs I put him in in the picture books and extend his life somewhat. The books are written by B.B. Bourne and they’re illustrated “in the style of Brian Biggs” by Simon Abbott. When this project began HarperCollins had several illustrators try out with illustrating a spread from this story. It was really really weird to see these illustrations that all had elements from the work I did for the picture books, but not drawn by me. So Simon did a great job. He didn’t slavishly mimic what I did, and has enough of his own thing going on to make it interesting. So far I believe there are three books completed or nearly completed.

The board books, on the other hand, are drawn by me. I just finished the first two books this week — the second one about thirty minutes ago in fact — and I’m not sure exactly when they’ll be published. The first one was called 123 Beep Beep! A Counting Book and the second is called Stop! Go! A book of Opposites. From the titles you can probably guess what they’re about, right?

These first two images are from Stop! Go! The illustration with the bike is “Slow” and the 4×4 is “Dirty.” The third image is from 123 Beep Beep! and is fairly self explanatory…



Wednesday, March 21st, 2012

The Boy Who Cried Alien cover

Today is publication day* for The Boy Who Cried Alien, by Marilyn Singer. Illumastrated by me. Published by Hyperion. I wrote a lot about this book a while back, and I’ll write about it some more soon. Go now to Indiebound or a favorite book store and get one for you, your spouse, your parents, your siblings, and maybe your kids.


Go now and get it.

* I think it’s today. It may have been yesterday.

Thursday, January 12th, 2012

The Boy Who Cried Alien cover

The Boy Who Cried Alien is a book unlike any other book I’ve not only had the chance to illustrate, but unlike any book I’ve read before. It takes the old Boy Who Cried Wolf tale and tells it a little differently. In this one, Larry the Liar is our protagonist, and one day he sees a tooth-shaped alien spaceship crash-land into a lake near the town where he lives. Larry, as his name would imply, has a reputation for telling tall tales, so when he runs into town to announce what he’s seen, no one believes him. (Well some do, but they’re loony-toons.) So as Larry tries to figure out a way to get the townsfolk to believe him, the two aliens, brothers named Dreab and Carlig, sing songs about their problems, which include the ship having crashed, being out of gas, and getting in trouble by their dad back home. Now, here’s where things get weird. Dreab and Carlig don’t sing in regular old English. No, Marilyn Singer devised a language for them all her own, based on rearranging certain letters of the words. For instance, instead of saying “Rocket Kaput, no more gas,” they sing “Tapuk Tocker, on eorm, sag.” Do you see the pattern here?
Luckily, Marilyn also saw fit to include a translation key in the book so the reader can understand what the aliens are saying, and about halfway through Larry is given a translator helmet so that he can understand what the aliens are saying. Here are a bunch of images of the book.

The Boy Who Cried Alien

The Boy Who Cried Alien

The Boy Who Cried Alien

The Boy Who Cried Alien

The Boy Who Cried Alien

The Boy Who Cried Alien

One of my favorite things about the book was a last minute bit of inspiration by my editor, Rotem Moscovich, at Hyperion. On the case cover, which is the inside cover, under the dust cover, we re-did the title and author/illustrator credits to read in the alien-language. I’d forgotten about this when I got my hot-off-the-presses copy in the mail yesterday, and when I opened it I just cracked up.

The Boy Who Cried Alien

Some books get written, get illustrated, get published, and the whole things seems like well-oiled machinery. And then there are books like The Boy Who Cried Alien. I’m not sure exactly when Marilyn Singer wrote the manuscript, but I know I first saw the it in July of 2007. Before that, at various times, illustrators as famous and talented as Dan Santat and Adam Rex were attached to it, and three different editors helped sculpt it into the work it is now. I often think of how relieved Marilyn must be to know that it is, finally, a real book and will be out in just a couple of months.
I’ll post more about this book as we get closer to publication date, including a bunch of sketches and outtakes. Ytas Dunet!

Tuesday, December 20th, 2011

Just in time for the holidays!

A while back I illustrated another fun project for Mudpuppy called Flip & Draw Sports. This is a kind of flip book where there are ten characters, split at the neck and waist, so that the legs, torsos and heads are all different and can be mixed and matched. There’s a baseball player, basketball player, soccer player, football player, golfer, hockey player, volleyball player, snowboarder, swimmer, and tennis player. Here are photos of some of the combinations.

You can get this at the Galison/Mudpuppy site here.

Friday, December 9th, 2011

I’ve been cranking out illustrations for the second book in the Everything Goes series for the past many weeks, and will be doing so for the next many as well. Here are some edits from two spreads in the book. Two helicopters, and one showing part of a cutaway of an airliner. Stay tuned for more.
The book will be out next September.

Friday, November 18th, 2011

I recently illustrated the cover of a special insert that SLJ publishes with their magazine. The concept was book series that schools use, in their libraries for instance. The art director, Mark Tuchman, wanted a space theme and since I like drawing astronauts, I had no problem with that.

First up is the original thumbnail of the image. This was one of those rare gigs where one is enough. Often I send a few sketch ideas, but in this case I didn’t need to.

The sketch gets tightened up if SLJ likes it, which they did.

I like to place it in the layout to see how it works. It was especially important in this case since the cover has that odd drop-down title.

After the sketch is approved, I ink up the final art and scan it in.

Then color is added in Photoshop and it’s done.

Once I sent the art to Mark, he placed it in a layout and worked on the color for the additional parts of the cover. This is pretty close to how it looked printed.

And lastly, they liked the image so much that they ended up asking for an additional astronaut for the interior as well.

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

Last month I made a couple of big complicated illustrations for a restaurant chain out in California called Rubio’s. They specialize in fish tacos and wanted a “Where’s Waldo” kinda thing that would be the basis for this game where you have to find certain items, fish tacos among them. The first game went up while I was away in Oregon last week, and the next one will be up on September 21.
Go up and see if you can beat my time of 38 seconds. Of course, I had a head start I guess.

Here’s the game.

(You apparently have to input your email address. Sorry about that.)