Archive for the ‘press’ Category



Friday, July 29th, 2011

I got a nice note last night that Kirkus has given Everything Goes: On Land a terrific review. This is the first real review that I know of and it’s a good start…

In a visual feast for fans of wheeled vehicles large and small, Biggs presents a series of high-density street scenes done in an amiably rumpled cartoon style.

Driving in from the ‘burbs to a generic metropolis, a lad and his dad gloss each big, double-page spread-” ‘Do trucks work the same way as cars?’ /
‘Many of them do. Trucks also have jobs, like cars’ “-as they glide through heavy traffic, past a construction site and under an elevated highway. They wait for fleets of bikes and motorcycles to pass and park at last near a train station to pick up Mom. Along with sparely labeled close-up or cutaway views of a car, a bicycle, a big truck, a subway station, an RV and other specimens, the author sets up the family reunion at the end with a giant double-gatefold aerial view of an entire neighborhood packed with traffic, pedestrians, local businesses and signs, each one individually distinct.

Jokey side conversations (one firefighter tells another, “There’s no fire. It’s just a cat”; his companion asks, “Should we get some milk?”) play off more serious and informative dialogue. A diagram of a car is accompanied by a disquisition on the relationship between a car battery and the motor, as well as the fact that “[a]n electric car uses batteries and electric motor. No gas!”

A glory ride for young car, truck, train, bus and trolley devotees.

You can see it here if you’re a Kirkus subscriber. If you’re not, they only give you a snippet.

Friday, July 15th, 2011

We received a few nice blurbs the other day from some book sellers who saw advance copies of Everything Goes: On Land. After a year-plus of sitting in a studio by myself cranking this thing out, it’s sure swell to poke my head out of the hole and read this kind of thing.

Everything Goes: On Land is the story of a boy taking a car trip to the city with his father and all the modes of transportation they encounter there. Each two-page spread introduces us to a different class of vehicle, which is then followed by a see-inside spread allowing us to learn more about the different vehicles’ parts and how they work. The pages are so busy and colorful that a child will spend hours poring over them and discovering new details. At the same time, color-coded speech bubbles allow the parent to read the story’s conversation between father and son.

For booksellers, this delightful book offers the best of both worlds — a book for a non-reader to enjoy alone, and one to be shared between adult and child. This would be a perfect recommendation for a grandfather to read to his grandson.

Everything Goes: On Land is informational, educational, and just downright fun – you’re not going to find a better combination anywhere! This is Where’s Waldo?, Richard Scarry’s Busytown, and See-Inside for a new generation! Bravo Brian Biggs!”
Mary Brown, Books, Bytes, and Beyond

“I love this book. I can’t wait to read it to Ian, my 2-1/2 year old nephew who is really into vehicles. It is very Richard Scarry (a favorite of mine). I love the bright colors and detailed illustrations. This is a book that you look at over and over again and still find new things. I love the comments of the people in the street scene. There is so much to look at! It’s a really great interactive picture book, which will be great to hand sell. This book just makes me smile.”
Jennifer Brenninger, The Doylestown Bookshop

“This picture book comes with a money-back guarantee for endless hours of enjoyment for kids as well as moms and dads. Everything that has wheels and goes gets the funny-interactive treatment with great little stories and illustrations by Brian Biggs. Richard Scarry has met his match!”
Becky Anderson, Anderson’s Bookshop

Tuesday, July 12th, 2011

I was interviewed by Tony Lewis of The Artfuls a few weeks ago. It’s a really nice site with some terrific design. In addition, it’s always fun to read interviews with other illustrators and learn what they listen to, what materials they use, and so on.
So the interview went live today. Enjoy.

Saturday, March 26th, 2011

Borders
It was a nice surprise today to learn that the Little Golden Book that I illustrated, I’m a T-Rex!, was one of the 100 best-selling children’s books of 2010. 100,590 copies isn’t bad, I suppose.

Tuesday, March 15th, 2011

David Paccia wrote last week asking if I’d contribute to a survey of illustrators and cartoonists that he posts at his blog David-Wasting-Paper. I was happy to oblige, and the survey was posted last night. If you’ve always wondered what kind of paper I like to draw on and whether or not I am right-handed, here you go.
Go forth and learn.

Monday, August 2nd, 2010

Many many years ago when I was obsessed with and serious about accordions, I met a filmmaker by the name of Robert Emmons. He was at the time planning to make a documentary about the Acme Accordion School in Westmont, NJ, where I was at the time taking lessons. About the time he started shooting this film I dropped out of Acme due to life getting in the way. Fast forward now about nine years, and I get an email from Robert.
The documentary about the accordion school didn’t get completed, but he’s been hard at work on other projects, completing two other full-length documentary films. Lately he’s been working on an interesting collection of shorter films, completing two a week for the last half year. He writes, “I set a goal to make two short documentary films a week based on randomly drawn words, they premiere every Wednesday and Sunday. At the end of six months, I’ll have 52 films. Today is my 50th, so only two to go!”

He wrote to me because I appear in the 49th film, which is footage from the aborted Acme documentary filmed in, I believe, late 2001. You can see the post about it here, and the film itself right here below. I make a small appearance at 1:33.

Now that’s cool and all. But take an hour or two and watch as many of Robert’s films in this project as you can. It’s really a terrific project. My favorite of the group so far is KALEIDESCOPE, which happens to be film #48. Robert’s got great taste in music as soundtrack as well, and since he spends some time writing about where the music for these films comes from, I can tell it’s important. As I watch these, I’m creating a not-insignificant list of musicians and bands to search for and get a hold of.

Years ago I was following a musician called Podington Bear who had a similar project going on, posting two or three songs every week for a year. And back when I was writing and drawing comics, I used to assign myself a page of writing — something complete with a beginning middle and end, not just a sentence or paragraph — every day. These kinds of exercises force one to get out of the claustrophobic and self-defeating need to make it perfect, and loosen up a bit. The results of these exercises are often not great, and never perfect, which is precisely the idea. However, they are usually inspired and the nature of the deadline is that one is forced to make decisions and stick with them, rather than hem and haw for months, never actually going anywhere.

Thanks for getting in touch, Robert.

Friday, January 22nd, 2010

My little movie “Playground” got featured on a terrific blog called PlayGroundology. It’s all about, yes, playgrounds. LIke it you will.

PlayGroundology screenshot

Monday, November 30th, 2009

Brownie & Pearl Step Out

Publisher’s Weekly posted a review today of the first book in the Brownie & Pearl series, written by Cynthia Rylant. It’s a very good review and happily makes a point of mentioning Brownie’s stockings. It’s the fourth review down on this page. In case you’re wondering, Brownie & Pearl Step Out will be published in very early January.

Here is the text:

Brownie & Pearl Step Out Cynthia Rylant, illus. by Brian Biggs. S&S/Beach Lane, $12.99 (24p) ISBN 978-1-4169-8632-4\

A birthday party (“Cats are invited”) is the outing spotlighted in Newbery Medalist Rylant’s sweet snippet of a story, first in a planned series, which introduces a happy if a bit timid girl (Brownie) and her similarly sanguine cat (Pearl). As they arrive at their destination, a front stoop festooned with balloons, Brownie has second thoughts: “Uh-oh. Brownie feels shy. Maybe she’ll go home.” But Pearl leaps through the cat door, forcing the issue (“Now Brownie has to knock”). She’s warmly welcomed and enjoys games, cake, and ice cream. Short, snappy sentences (“Look! Pearl went in the kitty door!”), a bold font, and spot-on themes for this age level—birthday party, spunky pet, and the rewards of overcoming shyness—tailor this for girls just beginning to read on their own. Bubblegum pink and lime green pop from Biggs’s (the Roscoe Riley Rules series) digitally rendered cartoon art, which features such endearing flourishes as Brownie’s mismatched striped socks and floral dress, as well as the pink flowers she and Pearl wear in hair and fur. Cheerful from start to finish. Ages 3–5. (Dec.)

Wednesday, February 25th, 2009

Hey, more virtual press!
Maura Cluthe, aka Fragmented on Flickr, has a blog on which she occasionally posts collections of robots she finds and likes. Some of mine were lucky enough to make it onto her site today.

Maura makes some coolio robots herself in her coolio studio in Kansas City. Check out her work here and here. Thanks Maura!

My robots written about.

Tuesday, February 17th, 2009

If you’ve explored my site at any length, you might have stumbled across my audio page, labeled “noise” on the menu up there. This is my little hobby area where I play out my secret life as a dj and electronic musician. I have a small room in my house with a red desk on which lives a pile of devices for making sounds. These include a turntable, a synthesizer, a MIDI keyboard, an old Casio thing, a touch-controller, and wads of cables.

Recently, I registered a domain name for the sole purpose of making an internet home for the things I make in this room. My plan is to move the noises away from MrBiggs dot com, and onto this new domain, which is DanceRobotDance dot com.

My friend Marc, who I know from back in the wild and wooly comics days, is also an electronic music guy. He’s had a wbsite for as long as I can remember called Disquiet dot com on which he writes about music, and which is one of the few sites to which I have subscribed via RSS. I’ve discovered a lot of terrific music via Marc’s site, and even when I don’t love what he’s got up there, I like reading what he has to say about it. When I got a few tunes up on Dance Robot Dance the other day, I sent him the link.
Today, Marc made Dance Robot Dance and my use of the web site Soundcloud.com for hosting my sound files the subject of a Disquiet post. Check it out.

disquiet dot com